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Vissarion Sharapov
Vissarion Sharapov

Of The People: A History Of The United States, Volume 1: To 1877, With Sources Download.zip Fixed



American Horizons, Second Edition, is the only U.S. History survey text that presents the traditional narrative in a global context. The authors use the frequent movement of people, goods, and ideas into, out of, and within America's borders as a framework. This unique approach provides a fully integrated global perspective that seamlessly contextualizes American events within the wider world. The authors, all acclaimed scholars in their specialties, use their individual strengths to provide students with a balanced and inclusive account of U.S. history. Presented in two volumes for maximum flexibility, American Horizons, Second Edition, illustrates the relevance of U.S. history to American students by centering on the matrix of issues that dominate their lives. These touchstone themes include population movements and growth, the evolving definition of citizenship, cultural change and continuity, people's relationship to and impact upon the environment, political and ideological contests and their consequences, and Americans' five centuries of engagement with regional, national, and global institutions, forces, and events. In addition, this beautifully designed, full-color book features hundreds of photos and images and more than 100 maps.




Of the People: A History of the United States, Volume 1: To 1877, with Sources download.zip



The fully peer-reviewed edition of The American Yawp will be available in two print volumes designed for the U.S. history survey. Volume I begins with the indigenous people who called the Americas home before chronicling the collision of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.The American Yawp traces the development of colonial society in the context of the larger Atlantic World and investigates the origins and ruptures of slavery, the American Revolution, and the new nation's development and rebirth through the Civil War and Reconstruction.


"As a collaborative historical enterprise, The American Yawp stands out for the breadth of its synthesis, the range of its sources, and the accessibility of its content. Taking inspiration for its title from Whitman, the text travels through the nation's multitudinous history with a verve and variety befitting the poet's free-flowing verse."


The American Promise has long been a course favorite for its readability, clear chronology, and the voices of Americans that animate the book. Now with new co-authors, the eighth edition continues to deliver a strong narrative with political backbone and offers a new pedagogical design that reinforces that history is a discipline rooted in debate and inquiry. The American Promise has primary sources in each chapter, a full-color map and art program, and comprehensive supplement options, including LaunchPad and a free companion sourcebook.


HIST 1 examines the development of western civilization, beginning with the ancient world of the Mediterranean, Europe, and Mesopotamia, and continuing through Early Modern Europe, which involves the Reformation, the Counter-Reformation, and the early period of the Age of Exploration. The course is intended to introduce aspects of Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern history that has helped to shape the developments of Western Civilization. The examination of written and visual primary sources, as well as secondary sources, allows this course to examine the political, religious, economic, and cultural development of the western world. The variety of sources used in the course aids the students in learning how to understand and interpret history, and encourages the students to develop a critical method by which to evaluate primary and secondary historical sources.


HIST 1H examines the development of "Western" civilization, beginning with the ancient world of the Mediterranean, Europe, and Mesopotamia, and continuing through Early Modern Europe, which encompassed the Reformation, the Counter-Reformation, and the beginning of the Age of Exploration. The course is intended to introduce aspects of Ancient, Medieval, and Early Modern history that have helped to shape the developments of "Western" civilization, including elements of its political, religious, economic, and cultural developments. The variety of sources used in the course aids the students in learning how to understand and interpret history and how to develop a critical method by which to evaluate primary and secondary historical sources.


This survey examines the history of "Western" civilization from the period of Early Modern Europe to the present. The development of social, political, and religious movements in Europe and the development of European colonies around the world had far-reaching, global repercussions. Among the broad developments of this complex period are the creation and collapse of several political and economic global empires, the development of modern nation states, revolutions in technology and industry, and the rise of nationalism, liberalism, socialism, and neoconservatism. The variety of sources used in this course will aid students in learning how to understand and interpret history and in encouraging them to develop a critical method by which to evaluate primary and secondary historical sources and to examine the political, religious, economic, and cultural developments of the "Western" world in the Early Modern and Modern periods.


This honors-level survey examines the history of "Western" civilization from the period of Early Modern Europe to the present. The development of social, political, and religious movements in Europe and the development of European colonies around the world had far-reaching, global repercussions. Among the broad developments of this complex period are the creation and collapse of several political and economic global empires, the development of modern nation states, revolutions in technology and industry, and the rise of nationalism, liberalism, socialism, and neoconservatism. The variety of sources used in this course will aid students in learning how to understand and interpret history and in encouraging them to develop a critical method by which to evaluate primary and secondary historical sources and to examine the political, religious, economic, and cultural developments of the "Western" world in the Early Modern and Modern periods.


An historical survey of the political, social, and economic development of America from colonial settlement through the Civil War and Reconstruction. This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. HIST 20 provides a historical overview of change over time in North America before 1877 with a focus on the diverse experiences of different groups of Americans. Students will receive an overview of the most important historical developments in America History from the colonial period through Reconstruction, including the history of American slavery, the evolution of American political systems, gender roles, and regional differences, changes in immigration, economic development, and the American Civil War and Reconstruction. While "knowing the facts" is obviously important to historical understanding, this course helps students develop critical thinking skills. These skills include: close and thoughtful reading and analysis of primary and secondary sources; looking for a broader coherence or "order" to the material; independent analysis and effective articulation (both in writing and in class discussion) of well-reasoned, well-crafted conclusions and interpretations and arguments (conclusions/interpretations / arguments which are supported by specific factual evidence derived from a variety of sources). The three specific course objectives underscore its scholarly dimensions: (1) Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the diverse histories of the peoples of the United States prior to 1877; (2) Students will gain an understanding and knowledge of the domestic, transnational and global political and economic processes that have shaped the lives, labor, institutions and cultures of the United States before 1877; (3) Students will learn how to "think historically" by placing documents written in the past in their historical contexts, and to consider the relationship of the past to the present. By the end of the course students will: Demonstrate an understanding of the chronology of American history prior to 1877. Demonstrate an understanding of the diverse experiences of different groups of Americans prior to 1877. Demonstrate an understanding of the economic, social, and political structures that emerged before 1877 and continue to shape the modern United States.


This course offers a writing-intensive historical survey of the political, social, and economic development of America from colonial period through the Civil War and Reconstruction, including the history of American slavery, the evolution of American political systems, gender roles, and regional differences, changes in immigration, economic development, and the American Civil War and Reconstruction. HIST 20Y provides a historical overview of change over time in North America before 1877 with a focus on the diverse experiences of different groups of Americans. Students learn how to "think historically", interpreting facts drawn from primary and secondary sources with the goal of understanding how historical events in America unfolded as they did. Students will learn how to recognize the relevance of the past to the present, and how to write to learn in ways that help them think about new material and learn to write in a historical genre. 350c69d7ab


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